Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 17th World Congress on Clinical Nursing and Practice Hotel Hilton Zurich Airport, Zurich, Switzerland.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Elisabeth Jacob

Edith Cowan University, Australia

Keynote: Blood sampling through peripheral intravenous cannulas: A look at current practice in Australia

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Clinical Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Elisabeth Jacob photo
Biography:

Associate Professor Elisabeth Jacob is currently the Associate Dean (Nursing) at ECU. She practiced as a registered nurse for over 20 years in both rural and metropolitan hospitals. She completed her PhD through Monash University in 2014. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals. Elisabeth’s research interests include: development of the nursing workforce; skill mix and its effect on patient outcomes; critical thinking and patient outcomes; acute nursing and mixed methods research.

Abstract:

Patients are often subject to numerous blood samples to diagnosis conditions and monitor response to treatment. Blood samples are traditionally drawn from peripheral venepuncture, a painful and technique that can cause bruising, haemotomas, infections, vasovagal reactions, and peripheral nerve injury. Increasingly intravenous cannula are being used for blood sampling. Arguments for obtaining blood samples from intravenous cannula include decreased pain, convenience, and appropriateness for certain populations, such as children, patients with blood  disorders or requiring frequent samples. Arguments against the practice suggest risk to infection control, patency of cannula and blood vessel and quality of blood samples. There is a paucity of evidence on which to base policies for or against blood sampling from intravenous cannula.

This study aimed to explore the prevalence of the practice of blood sampling from intravenous cannulas in Australia. Useing a cross-sectional design, participants were recruited through an anonymous survey distributed electronically by nursing organisations and  snowballing.

Five-hundred and forty-two nurses participated in the survey, with 409 providing usable responses. The practice was reported by 94% (n=388) of participants, with 57% (n=235) only taking blood from newly inserted cannulas. Reasons for use included difficult venepuncture (n=270, 66%), patient comfort (n=228, 56%), and frequency of sampling (n=210, 51%). Use was state dependant and differed between specialty areas.

There is a large of variance in practice regarding obtaining blood samples from intravenous samples between states in Australia, types of clinical practice and individual nurses.Patients are often subject to numerous blood samples to diagnosis conditions and monitor response to treatment. Blood samples are traditionally drawn from peripheral venepuncture, a painful and technique that can cause bruising, haemotomas, infections, vasovagal reactions, and peripheral nerve injury. Increasingly intravenous cannula are being used for blood sampling. Arguments for obtaining blood samples from intravenous cannula include decreased pain, convenience, and appropriateness for certain populations, such as children, patients with blood  disorders or requiring frequent samples. Arguments against the practice suggest risk to infection control, patency of cannula and blood vessel and quality of blood samples. There is a paucity of evidence on which to base policies for or against blood sampling from intravenous cannula.

This study aimed to explore the prevalence of the practice of blood sampling from intravenous cannulas in Australia. Useing a cross-sectional design, participants were recruited through an anonymous survey distributed electronically by nursing organisations and  snowballing.

Five-hundred and forty-two nurses participated in the survey, with 409 providing usable responses. The practice was reported by 94% (n=388) of participants, with 57% (n=235) only taking blood from newly inserted cannulas. Reasons for use included difficult venepuncture (n=270, 66%), patient comfort (n=228, 56%), and frequency of sampling (n=210, 51%). Use was state dependant and differed between specialty areas.

There is a large of variance in practice regarding obtaining blood samples from intravenous samples between states in Australia, types of clinical practice and individual nurses.

OMICS International Clinical Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Beth Harkness photo
Biography:

Beth Harkness has over a decade of experience providing clinical care and disease management to the pediatric and adult cystic fibrosis population and managing cystic fibrosis research at Children's National in Washington, DC, USA. Her special area of interest focuses on the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis disease and connections to care for the population affected with this genetic disease. In 2009 Beth conceptualized and implemented a program for the advancement of Genetic/Genomic awareness and education at Children's National and now works in collaboration with National Institute of Health (NIH) on Methods for Introducing New Competencies (MINC) in nursing.

 

Abstract:

In this era of precision medicine, limited strategies are available for educating the workforce of nurses to the global science of genetics/genomics.  In response to this contemporary issue, this presentation will describe methods for translating the recent advances in genetics/genomics into the infrastructure global nurse education.

A multi-modality educational program and implementation framework was developed based on Everett Rogers Diffusion of Innovations Theory and the Genetic/Genomic Competencies for Nursing Comparative approaches and outcomes were evaluated.  Surveys were implemented pre and post interventions to nurse participants with broad demographic backgrounds.

The national collaboration stimulated a synergy that created a convergent vision leading to the development of an electronic process platform.  Post survey findings; nurses stated greater understanding of implication of genetics/genomics; family history as the first genetic tool for the prevention and treatment of genetic conditions, concise electronic communication/education preferred, increased belief that genetics/genomics is part of each of nurses scope of practice. Time constraints and leadership resources challenged success and sustainability.  Infrastructure for policy, procedures and sustainability needed to be established for greater success. 

Leveraging various national cohorts increased education and awareness of clinical family nursing practice in the precision medicine era.  A web platform has been developed with the aggregate of resources from the research collaboration and an implementation pathway for nurse leadership and educators around the globe. Post survey results demonstrated the family nursing profession is poised and ready for the challenge of translating new science into practice to promote preventive care and treatment for families globally.  

 

 

Keynote Forum

Tony O Brien

The University of New Castle, Australia

Keynote: Men s Preconception Health, Healthy Fathers, A Practice Nurse Approach

Time : 11:15-11:45

OMICS International Clinical Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tony O Brien photo
Biography:

Tony O Brien is a Registered Hospital Trained Nurse in Mental Health and General at the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia. He has held Nurse Registration in Singapore, New Zealand and United Kingdom and worked as an RN in these countries. He has extensive clinical experience in mental health community case management, acute mental health nursing, mental health intake assessment and aged care. As a nurse academic, he has provided curriculum consultation to nursing groups and universities in Indonesia, Philippines, Japan, Brunei and Singapore; including curriculum review and development workshops. He has published over 200 publications including, reports, monographs, book chapters and journal articles. He has been the Lead or Co-investigator on over 40 nursing research projects during his academic career, to a total of over 2 million dollars. His research profile has focused on quality nursing interventions, practice development, service re-design, models of care and translating clinical research to improve the quality of patient care; more recently men’s preconception health.

 

Abstract:

This presentation addresses what practice nurses can do while working with men regarding preconception health improvement to become healthy fathers. Australian men live longer than previous years; however, they have not reached the levels of overall longevity that Australian women enjoy. Men have higher mortality rates for suicide, accidents and injury and higher mortality rates for the leading causes of death; tobacco smoking, hypertension, obesity, inactivity, cholesterol abnormality, and alcohol. Men are also vulnerable to the epigenetic effects on epigenomes that can potentially influence the transgenerational inheritance health of offspring during their lifetime. Australia’s first people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) men, continue to die well before non-indigenous men and also figure highly in mortality statistics for cancer, circulatory system disorders, respiratory disorders and endocrine and metabolic disorders. Wenitong (2002) argues in the context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men that a tailored indigenous cultural approach is critical to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men’s health. Many of the health problems that occur with indigenous and non-indigenous men are associated with preconception male health including, depression, alcohol abuse, COPD, diabetes and smoking-leading to health priority illnesses. This paper highlights men’s preconception health needs in the context of primary health care and what practice nurses can do to promote healthy male preconception behaviour.